Kahuku High and Intermediate School

Have a Safe Summer!  Schedule Pick up from 8:30am - 11:30am and 12:30pm - 3:30pm Date: July 12 & 13, 2017, 8:30 AM – 11:30 AM Location: Cafeteria

Green Curriculum

Kahuku Green Team Leading the Way in Sustainability

 

The Kahuku High and Intermediate School Green Team is taking their school and the North Shore community closer to a more sustainable, greener future. From a campus-wide program, which takes cafeteria and other waste and turns it into compost, to a computer repair and recycling initiative, Kahuku High and Intermediate School is widely recognized for its excellence in environmental activism.

 

The Hawaii State Department of Education, in conjunction with Hawaii Energy, the Hawaii Chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council, Jack Johnson’s Kokua Hawaii Foundation, and the Hawaii Association of Independent Schools, honored Kahuku High and Intermediate School as one of only six schools in the state to be selected as a Green Ribbon School.

 

This award establishes that Kahuku High and Intermediate School has significantly reduced its environmental impact and achieved greater energy efficiency, reduced costs, featured environmentally sustainable learning spaces, fostered health and wellness, and offered environmental education that boosts academic achievement and community engagement.  

 

By recycling cafeteria and other waste into compost, the school has reduced the frequency of garbage pickups, which cost thousands of dollars. The gardens the students have created using the composted soil provide healthy, nutritious fruits and vegetables, including kalo. Kahuku High and Intermediate School’s environmental initiatives include the Green Team and other extracurricular activities, as well as courses offered at the school, such as Natural Resource Management, Agricultural Education, and AP Environmental Science. Students in these classes acquire knowledge in sustainable practices, ranging from aquaponics to renewable energy technologies.

 

Green Team Director Uila Vendiola has devoted countless hours to raising Kahuku High and Intermediate School to a leadership position. In addition to the recycling projects, renewable energy was also part of curriculum. 

 

Kahuku Red Raiders...
 
Here is the project that our Environmental Resource Management students are working on this quarter that was inspired by Jack Johnson. (it's still in the beginning stages). 
 
Each of our 30 students are using a Science Board and will be appearing in an 'Olelo video to share their 'Re' ACTION VERBS and SLOGANS to IDENTIFY and come up with INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS for 30 different environmental challenges that IMPACT our community.
 
Kahuku Red Raiders Respond to students that can't afford to buy a school lunch by starting an edible school yard and growing produce using 6 banana circles within a Mandala garden on part of the campus which was previous covered with invasive weeds and fertilized with composted cafeteria food waste.
Red Raiders Return the earth's natural beauty to the way it was before we impacted it by eliminating invasive guava strawberry trees around our community since they choke out native plants and harm the soil.
Red Raiders Rethink their dependence on paper at school by using online technology tools such as google for education to replace the need to use paper, printers and ink cartridges which harm our environment.
Red Raiders Realize the importance of considering alternative methods of housing, food, utilities, transportation that have less impact on the environment.
Red Raiders Reorganize their possessions so they only keep what they need, and recycle, donate, and re-purpose the rest.
Red Raiders Repair broken items instead of adding them to a landfill by using give and take centers
Red Raiders Reawaken their inherent duty to improve the quality of life, to fight poverty and to improve sustainability for others in their community (guy on bike that teaches permaculture around the world)
Red Raiders Reconcile their personal nutrition needs by replacing rice with pahiai (kalo) to optimize their calorie and nutrition intake. (daniel anthony, replace starch with kalo for 2 months)
Red Raiders Recycle because they understand the relationship between long term success and sustainability in their community-(campus recycling)
Red Raiders Rebuild nature by joining forces with local groups that help restore nature, coastlines, beaches, promote local food, eliminate use of plastic bags
Red Raiders Replenish the 'aina (land) by throwing away their 'opala (trash) properly such as food trays around campus.
Red Raiders Refocus their efforts to be sustainable with transparency and accountability by purchasing produce at farmer's markets at byuh, waimea valley. kahuku elementary
Red Raiders Reward those who value renewable energy by encouraging vehicle owners to use electric cars and charging stations (at TBR, Laie shopping center, PCC - picture of electric car spot at laie shopping center and PCC)
Red Raiders Resolve to minimize the amount of can and bottle waste going into our landfill, ocean, streams-recycle bottles/cans by recycling campus waste at z1 and local restaurants
Red Raiders Rescue marine animals, birds and fish by using less plastic bottles and waste and by protecting storm drains from waste-(pictures of animals suffering because of waste, bird refuge at kahuku, storm drains)
Red Raiders Rehabilitate the harms done to the earth and other species by removing loose nets from the beach
Red Raiders Regenerate the earth by changing their hearts and caring about other living things and building symbiotic relationships-(teach kahuku elem students about waste - kokua hawaii foundation, docents)
Red Raiders Reforest land overrun by invasive plants and replace them with native plants to prevent soil erosion which kills the coral reef and reduces the fish population. -replace invasive plants in haiku valley, laie falls map of brown water on google maps
Red Raiders Realign themselves with their environment, their community and with city and county leaders to prevent a new landfill being located in kahuku by becoming champions of recycling and sustainability
Red Raiders Repurpose old items by using a give and take center in Laie on Saturday mornings, (get 10 items free for doing 30 minutes of volunteer service)
Red Raiders Redefine themselves by living within their meansl by growing their own produce, fish, medicine, spices using garden towers, square foot gardens and aquaponic systems next to their homes
Red Raiders Reimagine their community not allowing companies to grow GMO food, seeds and chemicals which are used to bully organic farmers, harm the soil and water supply. ( global bullying-prevent countries from forcefully selling gmo food and seeds, buy from local farmers, kahuku farms)
Red Raiders Recover the earth's precious resources - since the 'aina provides enough to satisfy every man's needs, but not every man's greed.” (gandhi)-helping others learn off grid living skills that put less stress on environment
Red Raiders Revitalize their path to sustainability, an endless expression of generosity on behalf of all humanity. (With our world of challenges and increasingly limited resources, sustainable development offers the best chance to adjust our course-becoming an example for sustainability)
Red Raiders Reuse bags recycled from water bottles instead of using plastic every time they shop (-reuse bags law starts July 1st-partner with Foodland)
Red Raiders Retain the earth's natural bounty for future generations by putting their food waste in compost piles instead of dumpsters
Red Raiders Revise their attitude to improve their persistent and determined efforts to keep the 'aina clean by restoring ancient fish ponds in haleiwa, kualoa and kahana
Red Raiders Refresh their environment by becoming the change they wish to see in the world (Gandhi)-define policies that will promote a clean environment should be for future generations
Red Raiders Reboot old technology by repairing old computers that can be used by students to do their homework ( society in the future-computer repair club, students needing computers)
Red Raiders Regulate harmful impacts on the environment by measuring waste harm on streams and the ocean by measuring and testing the quality of water, (pictures of local politicians, emails)
Red Raiders Reduce pollution by not allowing community members, hospitals and care centers to flush prescription drugs in toilet since the chemicals might not be totally eliminated by sewage treatment plants - kahuku and laie sewage treatment plants
Red Raiders Restore the environment by recycling paper waste with the use of a cardboard baler
 
 

Green School Initiatives

 

Introduction

 
  • Ask questions?  Cost of housing, utilities, gas now and in the future (year 1-80 timeline)
  • How will we plan?
  • What quality of life can we afford?
  • Continuity programs make us dependent.
  • Create innovate solutions.
  • Challenge class to innovate, measure proposal after-school experiment.
  • Change our opinion about waste. Waste to sustainability.

I. Environmental Impact and Energy Efficiency
 
  • Reduced or eliminated greenhouse gas emissions, using an energy audit or emissions inventory and reduction plan, cost-effective energy efficiency improvements, conservation measures, and/or  and on-site renewable energy and/or purchase of green power;
  • Improved water quality, efficiency, and conservation; 
  • Reduced solid and hazardous waste production, through increased recycling, reduced consumption, and improved management, reduction, or elimination of hazardous waste streams; and 
  • Expanded use of alternative transportation to, during and from school, through active promotion of locally-available, energy-efficient options and implementation of alternative transportation supportive projects and policies.
 

II. Healthy School Environments

 
  • An integrated school environmental health program based on an operations and facility-wide environmental management system that considers student, visitor and staff health and safety in all practices related to design, construction, renovation, operations, and maintenance of schools and grounds; and
  • High standards of nutrition, fitness, and quantity of quality outdoor time for both students and staff. 
 

III. Environmental and Sustainability Education

 

  • Interdisciplinary learning about the key relationships between dynamic environmental, energy and human systems;
  • Use of the environment and sustainability to develop STEM content knowledge and thinking skills to prepare graduates for the 21st century technology-driven economy;  and
  • Development of civic engagement knowledge and skills, and students' application of these to address sustainability 
 
 

Here are some additional initiatives we are working on that tie into our goals:

 

 (1) Animal health, production, and well-being. (we will be raising tilapia fish, freshwater prawns, chickens, rabbits, goats and cows)

 (2) Plant health and production. (we use worm droppings (vermicast) for plants to make them healthy instead of using fertilizer, pesticides)

 (3) Animal and plant collection and preservation.

 (4) Aquaculture.  (we currently have 3 aquaponics systems running and want to expand to 20)

 (5) Food safety.  (we will only grow organic food)

 (6) Soil and water conservation and improvement. (aquaponics uses 10 times less water compared to dirt farming since it is recycled)

 (7) Forestry, horticulture, and range management.  (aquaponics and sq. foot gardening uses 10 times less space than dirt farming)

 (8) Nutritional sciences and promotion.  (organic food is much more nutritious and healthy)

 (9) Farm enhancement, including financial management, input efficiency, and profitability. (we plan to have a weekly farmer's market on the property)

(10) Family and Consumer Sciences.

(11) Rural human ecology.

(12) Youth development and agricultural education, including 4–H clubs. (our sustainability club, science club, environmental club and student body officers will run it)

(13) Expansion of domestic and international markets for agricultural commodities and products, including agricultural trade barrier identification and analysis. (we will sell biochar from discarded wood that normally ends up in landfills)

(14) Information management and technology transfer related to agriculture. (we will measure the cost of running our sustainability farm and determine its ROI)

(15) Agro-biotechnology related to agriculture.  (we have been consulting with the top experts in aquaponics and aquaculture - Dr. Clyde Tamaru and Dr. Kai Fox)

(16) The processing, distributing, marketing, and utilization of food and agricultural products. (we can do all of this on our property)

 

Here are some of the goals we helped develop and support for our school:

 

Become Hawaii’s first Green Ribbons School - Promote 3 R's  – provide tours of sustainability gardens, working ancient Polynesian villages from 3 different locations.

 

Become Renewable Energy Education leaders – have students learn and teach all sustainability technologies. Merge latest technologies with ancient Hawaiian sustainability practices (i.e. use of water, kalo and fish ponds).

 

Become Hawaii’s Energy Efficient Leader – help community replace old bulbs with CFL’s. Encourage community to reduce electricity usage.

 

Become Food Security Innovators – build and share aquaponics, greenhouses, sq foot gardens, worm farms – grow organic fruits, vegetables, flowers, cotton, whitten kenaf, traditional Polynesian healing plants, herbs, mushrooms for each family that lives in Ko’olauloa (between Ka’a’awa and Sunset Beach).

 

Provide Feed Supplies – pellets for fish, rabbits, chickens using whitten kenaf, black fly larvae, alfalfa, left over greens.  Certify feeds with Oceanic Institute in Waimanalo.

 

Restore Endangered Habitats – birds (with Kahuku First Wind Biologists), moi fish and rare and endangered endemic plants. Beach cleanups.

 

Sell Sustainability Products – through kahuku.org either at their store or through e-commerce. Sell instructional pdf and youtube files.

 

Start a Farmers Market – to sell fresh, organic fruits, vegetables, herbs, peppers, flowers, teas, traditional Hawaiian plants.  Sell plants, seeds, seedlings, worms, vermicast, value-added products, sq. foot gardens, commercial and residential aquaponic systems, commercial and residential worm farms.

 

Become Emergency Preparedness Leaders – provide information on how to prepare 72 hours kits, install photovoltaic systems, sanitation, etc.

 

Build Tiny Homes – provides security for agricultural lands, saves money, keeps families together, shrinks demand on utilities, live in high quality living in smaller living spaces that requires less energy. Build from used 10’x12’ containers, 10’x12’ Rubbermaid sheds or from geodesic domes. Tie in with aquaponics, photovoltaic, solar panels, sq. foot gardens, worm farms, etc.

 

Become Digital Media Center Leaders – Have students teach sustainability curriculum on HD camera equipment on our own Green School location and publish our library of footage on ‘Olelo and youtube. The collaboration of Sustainability and Digital Media will get the word out not only in Hawaii, but throughout the world.  We are trying to follow Searider’s (located next to Waianae High School) model that will provide students with valuable digital media skills.

 

Become Sustainability Education Leaders – Tie in all sustainability education with Hawaii’s DOE’s common standards, general learner outcomes. Create sustainability class(es), create concurrent sustainability degree with WCC, BYUH and UH’s CTAHR. Have students help teach DOE teachers to get Green School certification.

 

Purpose:

 

Create hands-on opportunities for students and communities to learn how to become masters of sustainability by demonstrating that simple life styles encourage all of us to downsize, reduce living costs, reuse, recycle and recover resources.

 

Invite Hawaii preschool, K-12 and college students to learn how to build small off-the-grid portable housing units with the aid of local construction, renewable energy companies and the Hawaii military sustainability command.   The students would be taught to create a home on a 8.5’ x 24’ trailers which would not require a building permit. The home would be surrounded by aquaponics organic food producing systems using casket liners, old bathtubs, and other scrap materials that normally end up in landfills.  The housing and aquaponics units would be powered by photovoltaic and solar panels.  The unit would also include exterior rain catchment barrels, reverse osmosis and charcoal filters, solar toilets, a simple grey water treatment system, and space for square foot gardens and vertical growing towers. Use shredded tires as a part of potting mix in sq. foot gardens. Shred the plastic found on beaches and repurpose them for housing and aquaponics projects.  Create systems for drug and alcohol free low income families and homeless Hawaii veterans.

 

The affordable housing unit would help communities prepare for emergencies, evacuations and encourage a healthy, organic, less polluting lifestyle. The students could also create worm farms to grow feed for fish in the aquaponics system, using vermicast compost and worm tea as organic fertilizer.  Students would be encouraged to use innovative STEM and entrepreneur skills to reduce the cost of the unit and to increase its effectiveness. 

 

The unit would allow students to demonstrate to the public how to achieve a simple, sustainable life style by using vertical farming methods with plastic containers and bottles etc.  The students would be taught to use digital media to document progress as they build systems, thus creating DOE learning center curriculum. 

 

Create a social media website called hawaiisustainability.com to share sustainability ideas and projects. Emergency preparedness. Turn yard waste from Hawaiian Earth into fertile compost for sq. foot gardens. Sell on Kahuku.org.  Tie in federal workforce program. Make signage of process.  Wall becomes “powerpoint”.  Wall in shop showcases individual student innovation and CTE skills. Integrate CTE skills with student accomplishments with overlaying photos.

 

http://standardstoolkit.k12.hi.us

 

Before and after school programs. US Wildlife service and USDA. Long term program tie in with other programs. Consolidate outcomes.

 

Ancient Hawaiians were acknowledged by early European explorers as the original masters of sustainability.  Our system will help re-create ancient sustainable living methods while using modern technology.  Create working models of actual ancient Hawaiian fishponds on a small scale to show how they work.  (Heeia, Kahalu’u, Kualoa, Kaneohe, etc). Surround them in a sustainability garden with petroglyphs, native plants, etc. using waste materials.

 

Organization: 

 

We have spent the last 3 years organizing innovative renewable energy education through KREIC (renewable-resource.com) and Halau Haloa, HawaiiSustainability.com, HawaiiKidsMedia.com, Kokua Hawaii Foundation, BYU Hawaii Sustainability program, Na Kamalei pre-school, Kahuku High & Intermediate, Sunetric, Ohana Greenhouse, containerstoragehawaii.com, Kahuku First Wind, DOE, Olomana Gardens, Waimanalo Feed Supply, Windward Community College, Hawaii State Hospital, etc.

 

Benefits for students: 

 

Provides opportunities for senior projects, practical training, prizes, scholarships, college enrollment, community service, self-sufficiency; state, federal and international recognition.

 

Benefits for community recipients: 

 

Encourages self-sufficiency, emergency preparedness, reduce dependence on the grid and the need for expensive housing. Replace the need for subsidized meals (SNAP) with a new perpetual source of organic food, fish, purified water and natural medicine. Community can learn about ancient Hawaiian sustainability, lower the cost of food ($3,000 one time purchase of aquaponics system vs. half million dollars worth of food consumed over a lifetime), lower the cost to travel to purchase food (consume less gas), use less packaging, waste less..  Helps the community transition from imported processed foods to fresh local organic produce and fosters a healthier lifestyle.  Over 42% of America’s youth are now obese, a fact that deeply concerns the military since they are unable to recruit candidates that are overweight.

 

Benefits for teachers: 

 

Provides practical, updated training and support from industry leaders, leading edge innovation in technology, all training conforms with DOE standards, CTE, STEM, etc

 

Benefits for industry partners and entrepreneur mentors: 

 

Supply them with trained interns while they are still high school students. Learn and implement latest renewable energy technologies.

 

Benefits for sponsoring corporations: 

 

Build aquaponics systems for corporations so they can also share with the public how to live a more healthy, less wasteful and productive means of living and doing business through aquaponics.

 

Benefits for sponsors and supporters:

 

Work with Home Depot or Lowes, Malaekahana, Sunetric, Kahuku Film Club, Hawaii military sustainability command, ‘Olelo, FEMA, google, Kokua Hawaii Foundation, Blue Planet Foundation, Re-use Hawaii, eatlocalhawaii.org, chefann.com, USDA, Community-Supported Agriculture, Youth Conservation Corps, etc. Advertise their support on car wraps on our model homes and aquaponics systems.  Provide interns and researchers for renewable energy companies, provide digital media content for sponsors.

 

(display awards Won – display – sustainability, digital media, science fair, check)

 

(display poster of goals, location of future projects, location of vinyl posters of powerpoint presentations)

 

(display monitors that play sustainability curriculum for classes and outside tours, shows map, weather of our locations, yields)

 

Displays:

 

Seeds of Aloha - photos, videos, actual seeds, seedlings, fruiting plants:

 
  • Good plants are beneficial 
  • Bad plants cause harm (weeds)
 

Posters: Aquaponics principles, Halau Haloa, Hawaiian GLO’s

 

Photos of lo’i fields and fishponds

 

Maps of sustainability areas

 

Signage for each area, show:

 

- individual student project photo, mission, formal wear, project wear

 

- student standing with their sustainability mentor

 

- poster explaining processes, include chemical processes (how nitogen helps composting work)

 

- how it ties into GLO's

 

- instructables info

 

- video references

 

- qr code to our website and videos

 

- place to take pictures of projects

 

- art, Ko’olau mountains (Jarrod Pere with students)

 

Permaculture layouts of Z building and garden, Malaekahana property, Kahuku First Wind property

 

Websites:

 
  • HalauHaloa.com
  • facebook.com/groups/halauhaloa
  • facebook.com/groups/kahukugreenteam
  • HawaiiSustainability.com
  • InnovativeEducation.info
  • KahukuFilmClub.com
  • Renewable-Resource.com
 

Kahuku Sustainability Plan:

 
Organization (Demonstrate innovation and local leadership, Have the potential for growth and success) 
 
  • Stakeholders
  • Ko’olauloa Educational Alliance Corp 501c non-profit
  • Windward District DOE
  • Kahuku High & Intermediate School
  • Kahuku Sustainability Club (Halau Haloa)
  • Cafeterias (collection point of food waste)
 
Locations 
  • Digital Media studio
  • KHIS grounds 20 acres (Green School)
  • Malaekahana 2 acre site (outside tour site, storage, Polynesian village)
  • Kahuku First Wind property 1 acre (tour site, aquaponics, Hawaiian village)
  • Building Z and garden (sustainability innovation site)
  • Agricultural Area (Matt’s ongoing curriculum)
Projects (Stem from ideas and inspiration that are born in Hawai'i to meet the needs of Hawai'i, Employ scalable technologies and models that are applicable globally) 

  • Renewable resources
  • Local food production
  • Waste reduction
  • Social transformation

 

Kahuku Sustainability Club

Our group of teachers, parents and industry partners have spent the last year looking for projects for Kahuku students that

(1) fit the Hawaii DOE education standards,

(2) cover multiple educational disciplines that

(3) tie into sustainable careers that will help keep families together in Hawaii and

(4) provide purposeful, relevant, hands-on learning experiences for students.

Our goal is to help support the DOE to reach their General Learner Outcomes by teaching renewable energy technologies and aquaponics. Renewable energy is energy which comes from natural resources such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides and geothermal heat, which are renewable (naturally replenished).

How will Aquaponics benefit Kahuku students and how does it tie in with the DOE’s General Learner Outcomes?

Self-directed Learner (The ability to be responsible for one's own learning). Student discovers on their own the importance of learning about and using sustainability to create quality in their life.
Community Contributor (The understanding that it is essential for human beings to work together). The students realizes the importance of using aquaponics to sustain communities by providing healthy, organic food).
Complex Thinker (The ability to demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving)  The students needs to ensure the practical use and economic success of the aquaponics system through critical thinking and problem solving.
Quality Producer (The ability to recognize and produce quality performance and quality products)  The student looks for ways to improve the current aquaponics technology while trying to lower the cost, and finding the ability to duplicate and deploy the innovations on a larger scale.
Effective Communicator (The ability to communicate effectively) The student will use digital media to teach aquaponics and distribute the content for Hawaii DOE courses, ‘Olelo, youtube, etc.
Effective and Ethical User of Technology (The ability to use a variety of technologies effectively and ethically)  Use temperature and chemical gauges connected to a laptop to monitor aquaponics systems. Use computers to edit and distribute aquaponics videos.

 

- from http://doe.k12.hi.us/curriculum/GLO_rubric.htm

 

 

 

What Educational Disciplines can be integrated with the Aquaponics curriculum?

Agricultural education – Maximize yield of fish and plants at the lowest cost.
Architectural, Design and Technology education  - Design aquaponics systems for integration, appearance and savings.
Business education – Determine the ROI of aquaponics. Have students learn to run aquaponics as a business (similar to KEAC’s kahuku.org student-run retail project).
Career and Technical education – Use experience with aquaponics experts for career planning, acquiring letters of recommendation, completing service projects for job opportunities, apprenticeships, work permits, financial aid and scholarships.
Chemistry/Science education – Learn how to understand and monitor chemicals used in aquaponics.
Creative writing programs – Learn how to write aquaponics education scripts for learning, teaching, media.
Cultural and social studies education – Share how ancient Hawaiians used aquaponics to sustain themselves.
Economics education – How to make a sustainability system economically sustainable.
Engineering science and mechanics (STEM) – Learn how math, science and engineering can produce a successful aquaponics system.  Have students create various aquaponics projects for the annual science and engineering fair.
Environmental education – Learn how aquaponics systems save water compared to traditional farming.    
Filmmaking/Photography education – Learn how to use digital media to document aquaponics projects. Have students take stock photos and video clips for archives for use in digital and print media.
Geography education – Learn where ancient aquaponics projects were used in Hawaii (Kualoa, Kahana, Kaneohe, etc).
Health education – Learn how to switch from unhealthy fast food to organically grown vegetables and fruits.
History/Humanities education – Learn how aquaponics systems have evolved over time in Hawaii and how they have been used by different cultures.
Industrial/Renewable Energy technology – Learn the latest aquaponics technologies from state, national and international experts.
Information technology education - Learn how to use scientific measuring devices integrated with a laptop.
Journalism education – Have students research learning aquaponics technologies and write about them.
Leadership studies – Have students attend sustainability, environment and agriculture expos at UH and the Hawaii Convention Center.
Life skills – Learn how to interview aquaponics experts from Hawaii and elsewhere.
Management education – Learn how to manage an aquaponics project.
Mathematics education –  Learn how to solve aquaponics problems involving time, heat and pH levels.
Multilingual Education – Learn how to teach aquaponics in different languages.  (Japanese for visiting students and Hawaiian for local immersion schools).
Reading – Provide directed reading studies on aquaponics.
Special education -  Involve the special education class.  Meet with occupational therapists from Hawaii Mental Hospital and Kahuku Bobby Benson Center to see how working on an aquaponics farm helps patients overcome depression and addictions.
Physical education – Aquaponics is an outdoor activity which requires physical exercise and breathing clean air. 

We would like to create aquaponics videos similar to the “Kahuku Small Learning Communities” video that combine multiple educational disciplines:


 
 

Geographic Locations Served:

 

  • Oahu (through KHIS campus visits)
  • Statewide (through Hawaii DOE)         
    • Big Island of Hawaii (through interisland KHIS campus visits)
    • Kauai (through interisland KHIS campus visits)
    • Lanai (through interisland KHIS campus visits)
    • Maui (through interisland KHIS campus visits)
    • Molokai (through interisland KHIS campus visits)
    • Ni'ihau (through interisland KHIS campus visits)
  • Nationwide (through website, social media and youtube)
  • Worldwide (through website, social media and youtube)

Hawaii DOE Common Standards Taught:

 
  • Career and Technical Education (Technological Design and Career Planning)
  • Fine Arts
  • Health
  • Language Arts
  • Math
  • Music Learning Center
  • Physical Education
  • Science
  • Social Studies
  • World Languages
 

Sectors Covered:

 
  • Arts, Culture and Humanities 
  • Civil Liberties  
  • Community Development 
  • Early Childhood Education 
  • Education 
  • Environment Health 
  • Health
  • Housing 
  • Human Services
  • International 
  • Legal Services 
  • Medical Research 
  • Mental Health 
  • Philanthropy & Voluntarism 
  • Public Policy 
  • Spiritual Development 
  • Sports & Recreation 
  • Youth Development 


Halau Haloa (Kahuku Sustainability Club) Organization:

President:  Joseph Fonoimoana
Vice-President:  Spencer Waite
Public Relations:  Student
Treasurer:  Student
Teachers:  Dave and Julian Tyrell, Shop Class teachers
Advisors:  Dr. Don Sand, Uila Vendiola, Dr. Kendra Martin, Debra Vorheis
Volunteer:  Christian Wilson

 

Educational Goals - What degree(s) or educational goals are you seeking and from where?

 

Career Goals - What career are you planning and why? Is it related to sustainable technology?

 

Financial Need - Describe your financial situation as it relates to your/your family.

 

Work Experience - Any work experience that is related to your planned career?

 

Volunteer/Activities - Are you involved with any activities or volunteer organizations

 

 

HAWAII INNOVATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS

ORGANIZATION

The Ko`olauloa Educational Alliance Corporation (keac.info) Keoki Wallace

 

  • KEAC is a proactive association of school, business, and community members dedicated to providing career pathway partnerships and support to the Kahuku Complex Schools. 
  • KEAC has the distinction of being the first Hawaii federal School-to-Work program to become a non-profit (501 c3) corporation.
  • KEAC’s mission is to support and enhance college preparation and career opportunities for the young people who attend KHIS. 
  • KEAC initiatives in the Kahuku complex are many; including kahuku.org (an online store), the launching of the first advanced web design computer class on the Kahuku campus, and providing afterschool programs such as a film-digital media program that provides early career training in the industry.
 

Innovative Education (innovativeducation.info) Dr. Don Sand

 
  • A new project of KEAC
  • Oversees all digital media and sustainability initiatives by Hawaii Digital Media and Hawaii Sustainability, Halau Haloa
  • Has potential to become a new Department of Education Science Learning Center
  • Tie in with Kahuku High’s Personal Transition Plan (PTP)
  • Tie in with Kahuku High’s College and Career Center
  • Tie in with Hawaii Green Jobs Initiative (HawaiiGreenJobs.org)
  • Tie in with The Hawai‘i Build and Buy Green, Brownfields Redevelopment Conference & Expo and Hawai‘i Green Workforce Development annual conferences on Oahu, Hawaii
 

Hawaii Digital Media (hawaiidigitalmedia.com) Dr. Don Sand

 
  • Create success value and sustainability films for K-12 students
  • Provide advanced film and television training
  • Create master teachers video library
  • Create digital media internships
  • Offer graphics and animation training
  • Teach and provide digital marketing
  • Provide digital business training and life skills
  • Provide innovative learning using a broadcast quality video camera
  • Create virtual classroom and distance education
  • Provide OB development in digital media, film and television for those living in Ko’olauloa
  • Provide consulting services for innovative education 
  • Provide training to existing schools (charter, public and private)
  • Featured in Hiki No - May 2011 (PBS television program)
  • Won 1st place in ‘Olelo Youth Exchange video competition May 2011 - (600 entries)
 

Hawaii Kids Media (hawaiikidsmedia.com) Dr. Don Sand

 
  • Hawaii students creating films with mentors, politicians, experts
 

Hawaii Sustainability (hawaiisustainability.com) Christian Wilson

 
  • Provide scholarships to Kahuku high school students in exchange for their work on sustainability projects (aquaponics, vermiculture, fly larvae entrapment)
  • Partner with BYUH Food Services Sustainability Project, BYUH Sustainability Club, Kahuku First Wind, Kokua Hawaii Foundation, Polynesian Cultural Center, Hawaii Reserves, Hawaii Department of Agriculture, Waimanalo Feed Supply, Friendly Aquaponics.

Provide consulting services and brain trust of experts from developing models into new construction          
 
  • Kahuku Renewable Energy:  Renewable Energy (including photovoltaic, hydroponics, wind farms, OTEC, Ocean Thermal Energy Conservation Provide eco-tourism experiences for students, families, tourists
  • Agricultural and organic produce
  • Provide OB development in Sustainability in Ko’olauloa
  • Healthy eating, nutrition and food preparation
  • Provide agriculture internships
  • Support local farmer’s markets
  • Produced business management internship
  • Scholarship sponsorship and mentoring for students
  • Provide aquaponics and square foot gardening video training
  • Create and sell educational sustainability DVD’s produced by students


Halau Haloa (Kahuku Sustainability Club) (halauhaloa.com) Julian Tyrell, David Jay and Evan Fa

 
  • Create organic farm, aquaponics, vermiculture, larvae entrapment projects
  • Provide Aquaponic systems for a families of four. Collect unwanted 55 gallon drums and wooden pallets that would normally end up in landfills and have Kahuku High and Intermediate School students transform them into perpetual food source that will provide local families and communities with fresh, organic vegetables, fruit, herbs and fish in their own backyards powered by a small photovoltaic system.  Build vertical windmills made from 55 gallon drums to power aquaculture water pumps.
  • Provide scholarship money for students building the systems instead of paying an hourly wage (use student payment model used by Ma’o Organic Farms). Partner with experts on aquaponics, sustainability systems, recycling, etc and use them as mentors for students so they can enter college and obtain a meaningful career that will support and sustain themselves and their families here on the islands.
  • If requested, provide aquaponic systems for church properties, social service providers (Salvation Army), schools, etc.
 

Ko’olauloa Renewable Energy Innovation Center (KREIC) (renewable-resource.com) Christian Wilson

 
  • Provide Renewable Energy Education for students K-12
  • Provide tours of Kahuku First Wind to Hawaii K-12 schools (20 year partnership)
 

Administration of Innovative Education project department:

 
  • 2 Project managers
  • Part time staff to full time staff reflected by budget
  • Partner with DOE teachers to overlap curriculum with Innovative Education projects with proposed Science Learning Center
  • Grants and scholarships for BYUH, HPU, and U of H
  • Volunteers and strategic partners (industry leaders, parents, political and community leaders)
  • Student staff with paid internships (in the form of scholarships)
  • Classes brought to all schools in Ko’olauloa, from preschool to colleges 
 

Setup education vehicle that will provide:

 
  • A distance education website (has free courses and sells DVD’s)
  • Students in a Sustainability program, helping to shoot and edit video curriculum using Halau Haloa-Kahuku Sustainability Club
  • A couple of “Living School“ models such as Kahana Bay’s taro and fish ponds
  • A couple of sample curriculum programs finished as samples of participatory, hands-on, purpose and project learning
  • Incentive program: include certification levels, internship criteria
  • College teachers as well as cultural kupunas in Polynesian agriculture on the brain trust for program development and curriculum development
  • Create a DOE Learning Center for Aquaponics
 

SOME OF OUR RECENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN HAWAII

Five years ago, our organization formed a trust of mentors for a branch called the Kahuku Renewable Energy Innovation Center (KREIC).  The mission is to build and promote educational opportunities for KHIS students in sustainability and renewable energy technology fields.  This volunteer group is comprised of university professors, kupunas, community members, employees of Hawaii renewable energy companies, parents of students, KHIS science teachers and the KHIS principal, counselors and students.

Our latest initiative, Innovative Education, is comprised of filmmakers, scientists, Kupuna and agricultural teachers  (Dr. Don Sand, Dr. Clyde Tamaru, Dr. Kai Fox, Dr. Kendra Martin, Christian Wilson) is an additional branch of KEAC that is writing curriculum and delivering educational programs that engage, inspire, create learning experiences using student relevant subjects such as digital media, current youth issues, sustainability, aquaponics, organic farming, participatory learning and life skills. The “Film Club” is our after school program that currently has 27 active members.  Our new Kahuku Sustainability Club named Halau Haloa currently has 20 members.

COMMUNITY NEED BEING ADDRESSED
 
The students living in the Ko’olauloa District (Ka’a’awa, Punalu’u, Hau’ula, Laie, Kahuku and Sunset Beach) have unmet needs for educational experiences that are relevant to several rapidly growing modern industries such as film, digital media and the sustainability industry.  These are fields that will provide jobs and advanced education for those students who are allowed to learn these skill sets early.  The traditional school system is slower in responding to these relevant programs that we are helping to bring now, today.

The Innovation Education branch is dedicated to helping students receive programs in these 21st century industries.  The programs are developed and delivered in creative, participatory methods that are based on living projects in self-directed ways. It is believed that the students not only learn advanced knowledge in these relevant industries but that they develop actual skills sets needed to become valued employees.


The students learn business world and college world “people skills”, project management skills, leadership, teamwork, time management and problem solving.  Each target student groups can be inspired accelerate their educational productivity.


The “at risk” students find that there are reasons for learning traditional subjects in school and the advanced students are allowed to enhance their gifts and dreams.

WHAT WE DO

Funds and support would help increase capacity of our after school programs including the Kahuku Sustainability and Film clubs and building living sustainability projects.  We will continue to develop new advance curriculum and film the student projects as a “students teaching students” educational video series   A portion of the funds would be used to hold contests around renewable energy issues that would inspire students to learn using a camera as a fun learning tool.

OUR INTENDED PARTICIPANTS

Our target group continues to be 2 very different youth groups, the “at risk” students and the “gifted students”.  The goal is to bring these educational experiences to at least 100 per year in the sustainability programs and 100 students in the film-digital media programs.  The students will be selected from those attending KHIS, while 100 more students will be offered program experiences from Kahuku Elementary School.

OUTCOMES WE YOU EXPECT

The outcomes would be measured in terms of the number of students in the programs, learning projects, and learning contests.  We will continue to build a platform in Kahuku that will become a major pipeline for innovative learning programs, mentors, internships, and courses in 21st Century careers skills and knowledge.  Benefits to students will include a decrease in drop out students, improvement of grades, and more gifted students entering the competitive smart technological fields that add to the quality of life in the islands.

HOW WE WILL MEASURE THE EXPECTED OUTCOMES

The success of our program can be measured by the number of students taking the sustainability and renewable energy classes and the digital media courses. We will also measure the number of students that have received certifications and have participated in our learning experience projects, contests, and field trips.  Motivation of the students in our programs can be measured by attendance, improvement in grades, and placement in colleges.  These accumulated certifications, interactions with mentors, new letters of recommendations, sustainability and digital media contests won will go far to improve the chances of students being accepted in colleges and receiving scholarships.

HOW FUNDS ARE SPENT

The aquaponic projects will require the purchase of all materials to build the working model including pumps, foundation, scaffolding, sun screens, tubs, soil, starter fish and plant seed.  A portion of the funds would be used to develop more curriculum in both digital media and agriculture.  Student incentives would include prizes for the contests and token fees for mini-internships.

RENEWABLE RESOURCES

Because of Hawaii’s ideal location and temperature, its residents can become masters of sustainability and stop being dependent on the grid by paying the most expensive electricity, gas and food in the nation. 

LOCAL FOOD PRODUCTION 

Use simplicity and affordability of aquaponics and vermiculture to encourage the growing organic food in backyards or apartment lanai’s of Hawaii residents.

SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION IN THE ABOVE AREAS 

We need to reduce our dependency on fossil fuels by growing our own food where we live thus reducing the need to:

 
  • ship from the mainland and to stores from warehouses, and from warehouse to grocery stores,
  • drive to a grocery stores and gas stations
 

We need to grow our own produce so we can know:

 
  • the source of the food
  • we can be assured the food is not genetically modified 
  • contaminated with unsafe fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides (organically grown and harvested)
  • we can prepared for a disaster when gas, food and money is not available
  • we need to be examples to our children and grandchildren that it is possible to live off the food we grow ourselves
 

ORGANIZATION 

 
 Demonstrate innovation and local leadership
 

Our organization will consist of a partnership of forward-thinking individuals who see the value of assisting the youth of our communities to take aquaponics and sustainability as a way of life.  They will also recognize the value of the educational process they will be engaged in along the way.

 
 Have the potential for growth and success due to our involvement
 

It will be relatively easy to scale for growth since aquaponics uses very little space and few resources.  Every family in Hawaii should have access to inexpensive, fresh organic produce.  Every student in Hawaii deserves the chance to learn about aquaponics and fulfill the DOE rubrics at the same time.


COMMUNITIES 

 
 Stem from ideas and inspiration that are born in Hawai'i to meet the needs of Hawai'i
 

Ancient Hawaiians were masters of sustainability. We need to re-create how Hawaiians turned the most remote islands into sustaining over a million people without modern technology.

OUR PROJECTS

 
 Employ scalable technologies and models that are applicable globally
 

Integrate digital media program with sustainability programs (wind farm, aquaponics, etc)

Teach Healthy and Sustainable Living programs:

 
  • eat healthy, organic food, 
  • make use of small 200 sq area behind home (10 x 20’?) as an after school experiment station (small aquaponics system, square ft. garden) to grow vegetables, fruits, herbs
  • set up aquaponics systems and dq ft gardens at Kahuku High & Intermediate; Ka’a’awa Hau’ula, Laie, Kahuku, Sunset Beach, Haleiwa Elementary Schools; Na Kamalei pre-school
  • encourage the use and education of renewable sources of energy
  • reduce, reuse, recycle (Kokua Hawaii Foundation)
  • learn how to live off the grid
 

Build inexpensive aquaponics and organic sq ft gardens from used materials for families of 4

 
  • use rainwater catchment systems from roof using plastic 55 gallon drums for water
  • provide photovoltaic system to power pumps (Costco)
  • raise vermiculture to recycle food waste and to create quality soil, fish food
  • use worm castings for worm tea to fertilize and protect plants from pests organically
  • raise and trap fly larvae for fish food using larvae traps (Waikiki Worm)
  • reverse osmosis system to provide clean water for humans (Costco)
  • grow taro and talapia/giant prawns for starch and protein to replicate ancient Hawaiians
  • grow plants for essential oils, make soaps, lotions, etc using distiller (Heart Magic)    
  • use temperature, ph, potash monitoring devices (Ace Hardware)
  • use Ted 5000 to measure electricity usage
  • use food to barter, use for emergency food and water supply.
  • use inexpensive materials - craigslist for old drums, wal-mart swimming pools, pumps
  • use symbiotic relationships - learning, teaching (kupuna to keiki), fish and plants
  • use Ben Schaeffer, Dr. Hammond and Kapua Fonoimoana to check systems
  • use grey water system, special laundry detergent, reeds
  • reduce cost of utilities, health costs,
  • decrease cost of going to fast food restaurants,
  • provide excess for local farmer’s market’s,
  • decrease cost of transportation, oil - decrease need to travel to get food, gas
  • use electric golf cart powered by photovoltaics
  • use 10 garbage cans to collect waste - food, greens, metal, plastic, paper - vermiculture, mulch
  • send cans and bottles to Reynolds Recycling
  • use grey water to flush toilets, wash cars, water lawn
  • reduce the need for fresh water
  • use fans powered by photovoltaics instead of using air conditioning
  • grow herbs as medicinal plants, essential oils
  • integrate weight loss, fitness, spa
  • make own toilet paper from recycled paper
  • use food for school breakfast and lunches
  • use fermented noni juice as ethanol for vehicles and generators (remove excess water)
  • build chicken coop to get fresh eggs every day
 

Have BYUH college students teach Hawaii high school and elementary school students:  onsite and via youtube.

Integrate with BYUH Food Services, Sustainability Club, Environmental Club, Hawaiian Studies Program, Kokua Hawaii Foundation

BYUH and KHIS students receive scholarships, college enrollment, fulfilling careers in sustainability

Use current PCC old farm to collect food waste

Use KHIS Z building to build aquaponics systems and use as a training and staging area.

Overview:

Innovative Education is a branch of the non-profit KEAC that develops and implements new educational products and programs that engages, inspires, creates learning experiences using student relevant subjects such as digital media, current youth issues, sustainability, participatory learning, and life skills.

 

The Innovation Education branch is dedicated to helping students enhance skill sets, participatory learning, and productivity habits valuable in becoming excellent students, live-long learners.  Each project is focused on delivering training for students to  develop career communication skills, goal oriented productivity, team work and showing how to make learning fun.

 

Learning can be purposeful, (around a project),  practical to apply and implement in ones life, enhances the quality of ones life now, relevance in today’s world.

 

The Ko`olauloa Educational Alliance Corporation (KEAC) is a proactive association of school, business, and community members dedicated to providing career pathway partnerships and support to the Kahuku Complex Schools. KEAC has the distinction of being the first Hawaii federal School-to-Work program to become a non-profit (501 c3) corporation.

 

Kahuku High and Intermediate School (KHIS) is a public school that serves approximately 1,850 students in grades 7 through 12 on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. The students of Kahuku come from the rural communities of Ka’a’awa, Hau’ula, Laie, Kahuku, and Sunset Beach—creating a school community that spans 26 miles along Oahu’s North Shore. The cultural background of Kahuku’s student body is richly diverse with its students representing Asian and Pacific Islanders, Caucasians, Hispanics, African Americans, American Indian and Native Alaskans. In addition, approximately 46% of the students are from economically disadvantaged families; classifying KHIS as a Title 1 school.

 

KEAC’s mission is to support and enhance college and career opportunities for the young people who attend school in the Kahuku Complex. KEAC initiatives in the Kahuku complex are many; including the launching of the first advanced web design computer class on the Kahuku campus, helping the school to acquire and oversee a Work Force Investment Act project that provides work experiences for 100 disadvantaged youth every year, and linking the school to a San Francisco State University pilot project that provides transition opportunities to the community’s most severely handicapped students.

 

One of the bigger projects KEAC has provided assistance in is the development of the school's online store, KAHUKU.ORG. KAHUKU.ORG was conceived by students and is operated by the students to raise money for their school’s programs. KEAC board members helped this project set up infrastructure, fully develop the web site, and secure exclusive permission to use school logos on products for sale. KEAC board members contributed thousands of volunteer hours to move the initiative from vision to reality.

 

In addition, KAHUKU.ORG provides viable work experiences for students, is a vehicle for promoting school news through its website, raises money for school groups through the sale of Kahuku logo and community projects, and helps alumni make connections through an extensive database. KAHUKU.ORG also helps to ensure that students are the beneficiaries of any fundraising efforts related to the school name, logos, or programs.

 

Our organization has recently formed a volunteer committee, Kahuku Renewable Energy Innovation Center (KREIC), for the purpose of mounting a focused and sustained effort towards creating and promoting educational opportunities for KHIS students in renewable energy technologies.  This volunteer group is comprised of university
professors, community members, employees of Hawaii renewable energy companies, parents of students, Kahuku High School science teachers, and the KHIS principal and counselors.



Project Description and Rational

Specific Aim: The specific aim of this proposal is to secure funding to help launch a new Kahuku Green Team educational programs throughout the Ko’olauloa moku (from Kualoa through Sunset Beach communities).

 

Filmmaking,advanced film classes, online classes, online collaboration, student generated educational video, internships, etc.

Learning to make films is not only fun for students, but the contemporary digital media process is the most relevant communication language for youth.  Each job title in the film making process from writing to producing to editing, has overlapping skills that are valuable in hundreds of career pathways.

 

Sustainability and Renewable Energy:

It is generally recognized that innovations in science and technology hold the answers to local and global challenges of energy, climate, health and food; challenges that are threatening our economies and lives. Hawaii is nationally recognized as an ideal location for developing innovations in renewable energy because of its abundant natural resources such as sunlight, wind speed, temperature and proximity to the ocean. Taking a lead in advances in renewable energy has the potential of opening up many career and economic opportunities for Hawaii’s people, and is at the forefront of Hawaii’s economic development plans.

Since the State of Hawaii is comprised of isolated islands, its dependence on imported oil to supply energy for electrical plants, and gasoline for vehicles make it particularly vulnerable to sudden price increases, oil embargoes, etc.  Alternate and sustainable sources of energy are likely to be developed in Hawaii and we want to ensure that our students are prepared to pursue the careers in the sciences and technologies that will be utilized in these efforts. Many universities have, and are creating, new programs in green and sustainable technologies, including the University of Hawaii’s Natural Energy Institute. In addition, Hawaii is becoming known as an incubator for renewable energies and many outside companies are planning to invest here too.  To name a few, the Royal Dutch Shell PLC is heading up a test venture in Hawaii to turn oil-rich algae into fuel. If the process is found commercially viable, the Anglo-Dutch conglomerate could build algae-processing plants elsewhere.  Ever-Green Energy LLC of St. Paul, Minn., plans to build a plant in Honolulu that uses seawater to cool office buildings; if successful, the project will be expanded to other states. A start-up company, meanwhile, is deploying miniature solar-thermal collectors on Oahu to help generate more power for the local electricity grid.

Offering a program in renewable energies and sustainability for communities in the Ko’olauloa area will enhance student awareness of the career opportunities in this growing field and help prepare students for the kind of technical training they will need to take advantage of these new opportunities in Hawaii.

 

Governor Lingle has recognized the importance of our youth for Hawaii’s economic future and has funded an Innovation Initiative as part of a long-term effort to develop Hawaii’s innovation capacity. Part of this initiative is to further enhance science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education.  In 2008, KHIS was fortunate to receive two fully outfitted teaching laboratories for their 9th grade students as part of the Governor’s initiative.  In addition, the Kahuku Community Fund provided the funding for supplying all of the new lab stations with laptop computers, thus making a fully equipped science teaching facility available for Kahuku students.  It is our intentions to utilize these lab facilities to implement the renewable energy education program with the help of Kahuku’s STEM teacher.

 

Another aspect of our group, KREIC, is the creation of a business/education internship and mentorship program.  This includes Jeff Bloom and other members of the Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DEBDT), Kahuku STEM teacher, Dr. Kendra Martyn, and career pathway counselors, parents and other community stakeholders (First Wind and Hawaii Reserves’ biodiesel project). They are all committed to helping us firmly establish a Kahuku Renewable Energy Innovation Center where students can work on projects of their interest along with mentors from leaders in renewable energy or other related fields (please visit the KREIC’s website, renewable-resource.com for more details).  The KREIC volunteer group has met monthly at KHIS since May 2008.

Success of our program will be measured by the number of students electing to take a course in renewable energy in the second year and the number of students competing in our renewable energy fair, taking on renewable energy science fair projects and, enrolling in additional science classes.

Funding Priorities

This proposal meets the Kahuku Community Fund priority “Educational Opportunity”.  The use of Kahuku Community Funds would be used to increase the awareness, usefulness and application of science and renewable energy technology at KHIS and in the Kahuku community. By promoting this project, Kahuku students will receive the guidance and experiences they will need to take advantage of the post high school opportunities that will become available in the near future as Hawaii expands its renewable energy technology.  So often Hawaii’s young people are forced to leave the islands to find career opportunities, but with explosion of need, interest, and support at the local and national levels for development of renewable energy technology, Hawaii may finally be able to offer its young people the suitable opportunity to stay at home.

Furthermore, many of these technologies could be developed in rural areas and the Kahuku community could easily support industries in biodiesel, hydrogen fuel, and a wind farm (First Wind) etc.  Local students trained in the science and technologies of renewable energies will be prepared to become the entrepreneurs in the community.  This would meet the priority “strategic action plan around future development of the Kahuku community” and lead to “economic sufficiency for self, family and community.”

Funds would be administered by the KEAC board of directors and coordinated by the director of the Innovation Education Dr. Don Sands.

If the Kahuku Community Fund cannot support us this year we will seek funding elsewhere in the near future and start a limited program now.  However, it is a challenge to sustain the energy level of our volunteer group without some funding.

First Wind of Kahuku has asked our group of Kahuku High School students to help provide tour guides for their operation.

 

 

Kahuku Green Team and Halau Haloa Implementation Plan

What: Halau Haloa Farms - Ahupua'a
·      Organic Aquaponics and Vegetable & Fruit Farm for tourists, community, schools
·      Healthy, Organic Food and Personal Fitness Program
·      Media Center/Sound Stage
·      Youth Success Coaching Center
·      Hawaiian Art and Values Center
·      Scholarship and Computer Donation program
·      Cultural Immersion Center mentored by Hawaiian kupuna
·      Renewable Energy Technology Education Center
·      Sustainable Living Education Center (Off-Grid Living)
·      Recycling Education Center (Kokua Foundation)
·      Hands-On Sustainable Learning Center & Showcase
·      Donating Computers for Students in exchange for farm work
·      Laie Community Center
·      Laie Science Academy
·      Laie History, Orientation & Tour Center (diorama of Laie)
·      Laie Bike Path starting/ending point
·      Activity Marriott Courtyard guests early PCC guest arrivals
·      Gateway to PCC (via lagoon, Laie Tour, bike path, parking)
·      Educational grant writers’ meeting area
·      Kahuku Media will document all activities on youtube
·      Square Foot Gardening, Richie Norton

Why:
·      Youth leadership and social enterprise development is our core objective, with strategies to build a localized movement to put the value of aloha ‘aina into action.
·      The current economy of Laie, Oahu, Hawaii, the US and the rest of world have reached unsustainable levels. (there is only a 5 day food supply on the island of Oahu since only 10% of food is grown locally).
·      Now is the time to teach the youth of our community not only to survive, but how to thrive using provident living skills using the latest renewable energy and organic farming and aquaponics technologies and other resources.


How to Implement:
·      Provide useful sustainability hands-on training for residents and tourists.
·      Build in carefully organized and sustainable stages
·      Recreate the Polynesian village: peaceful, inviting, lava rock walls, water treatment, native plants. High tech hidden behind thatching, bamboo…
·      Solar-voltaic tram or trolley Tour transport, food, students: should be connected to key student and community needs:  stores, post office, beach, library, school, church, work, and to the key areas.
·      Homes in Ko’olauloa should have areas to grow private organic gardening and fruit trees.
·      Should be designed to make us of natural lighting and to be cooled without air-conditioning
·      Village social engineering, that encourages connecting of family from baby to grandparent,
·      Conform to current Ag zoning
·      Exit strategy - make buildings portable, leave a very small imprint, make it possible to return 3 acres of farms to original state within 48 hours

Where:  KHIS, Malaekahana and Kahuku First Wind Sites

When:  May 2011 (stage 1)

Who Will Benefit:
·      BYUH, Kahuku High & Intermediate, Ko’olauloa elementary students and teachers,
·      Ko’olauloa Kupuna (from Kahuku senior housing, etc),
·      Local organic farmers,
·      Hawaiian studies students,
·      Polynesian artisans

Organization and Partnerships:
·      BYUH Jonathan Napela Hawaiian Studies Program
·      Ko’olauloa Sustainability (Management)
·      Kahuku Media/Kahuku Film Club
·      First Wind (Carolyn)
·      100 Renewable Energy companies on Oahu
·      STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics)
·      Laie Science Academy (Dr. Baize)
·      Queen Liliuokalani Center
·      Polynesian Cultural Center Overnight Immersion Program
·      Envision Laie
·      Na Kamalei 
·      Hawaii Reserves (land)
·      Laie Farmers Market (HRI)
·      Rep. Jessica Woolley
·      City and County of Honolulu (Councilman Ernie Martin, District II)
·      Federal and State Grants (Sen. Hirono, Dept of Agriculture)

 

Proposal for Kahuku Green Team:


Departments to include:

 

A.     Sustainability and Renewable Energy

 

B.     Digital Media Education

 

Each Department has a staff, volunteers and service both Kahuku High School and Intermediate as well as other students in Ko’olauloa. 

 

Examples of divisions in Sustainability:    

 

a. Agricultural and organic produce

 

b. Kahuku Renewable Energy:  Renewable Energy (including photovoltaic, hydroponics, wind farms, OTEC, Ocean Thermal Energy Conservation and Eco-tourism

 

c. Home, square foot gardening

 

d. Healthy eating, nutrition and food preparation

 

e. Agriculture internship

 

f. Produced business management internship

 

g. Scholarship sponsorship and counsel for students

 

h. Create and sell educational DVD’s, video.google.com

 

i. Job development in Sustainability in Ko’olauloa

 

j. Consulting services and brain trust of experts to developing models into new construction

 

Examples of division in Digital Media:

 

a. Advanced film and television training

 

b. Master teachers video library

 

c. Digital media internships

 

d. Graphics and Animation

 

e. Digital marketing

 

f. Digital business training and life skills

 

g. Innovative learning using a camera

 

h. Virtual classroom and distance education

 

i. Job development in digital media, film and television for those living in Ko’olauloa

 

j. Consulting services for innovative education in

 

Existing school, charter, public and private

 

Administrative and instructional structure:

 

Administration of innovative project department:
1.   Project manager
2.   Part time staff to full time staff reflected by budget
3.   Partner with DOE teachers to overlap curriculum with innovative education projects
4.   Grants with BYUH, HPU, and U of H
5.   Volunteers and strategic partners ( industry pros, parents, community leaders)
6.   Student staff with paid internships
7.   classes brought to all schools in Ko’olauloa, from preschool to colleges to have educational vehicle up and running now  need:

[  ] A Distance education website ( has free courses and sells DVD’s)
[  ] students in a Sustainability program, helping to shoot and edit  video curriculum ( club)
[  ] a couple of “Living school“ models such as Kahana Bay’s taro and fish ponds
[  ] a couple of sample curriculum programs finished as samples of participatory, hands-on, purpose and project learning
[  ] Incentive program: include certification levels, internship criteria
[  ] college teachers as well as cultural Kupunas in Polynesian agriculture on the brain trust for program development and curriculum development 

 
 

Kahuku High and Intermediate School 2015

 

Criteria:

 

1. The proposed project is truly innovative. It breaks with conventional ideas or processes in its field. It goes beyond marginal improvement of methods that already exist.

 

2. The project is beyond merely the idea stage. There has been additional testing, demonstration or prototyping. The applicant has invested time, resources, and thought into assessing project viability.

 

Island Innovation Fund Criteria 

 

The Career and Technical Education Standards (CTE) that are integrated into the Grant Proposal are as follows:

 

CTE Standard 1-Technological Design.

 

a. Students will design, modify, and apply technology to effectively and efficiently solve problems.

 

b. Job Search Resources. Students will assess demographic, geographic and technological trends and explains how they may affect opportunities in a chosen career.

 

CTE Standard 2- Career Planning

 

a. Students will explore and understand education and career options in order to develop and implement personal, educational and career goals.

 

b. Students analyze annual individual and career goals.

 

c. Students evaluate potential career choices in relation to personal interests, strengths and values.

 

d. Students appropriately apply safe behaviors and practices in the school, community and workplace.

 

Science Technology Engineering Mathematics (STEM) Related Standards are also implemented into the grant. Resources and guidelines will be provided by an on site committee member of the National Task Force on S.T.E.M. Education in Washington, DC.

 

The alignment to the Hawaii Content & Performance Standards (HCPSIII) and the US Common Core Standards is currently underway for S.T.E.M. education in Hawaii. A DOE task force has convened and is working to provide the aligned framework as part of the Race to the Top inititiave. All units of study in Language Arts and Math have been transitioned to the US Common Core Standards, for grades K-2 and 11/12. All HCPSIII standards are required to be implemented in SY 2014-15.

 

3. The innovation has clear potential for impact beyond the applicant organization. If successful, the project could scale up to reach more people, other communities, or additional organizations. The applicant identifies a plan for doing this.

 

The partnerships for this project are evidence of impact beyond the applicant organization. Planning is on going with the U.S. Army 25th Infantry division as well as Kahuku First Wind, Kokua Hawaii Foundation, and BYU Hawaii. Planning for this project has been ongoing for three years, and has been integrated into the C.T.E. programs. Plans are to provide sustainability education to the community, to insure the general public, including small businesses and major corporations learn how to live a more energy efficient life for our future generations through renewable energies.

 

4. The innovation team has the experience, knowledge and skills to successfully implement the project. If partners are needed, they are identified and their contributions are clear. Units of study including aquaponics organic food producing systems, photovoltaics, solar panels, reverse osmosis and charcoal filters, worm farms, organic fertilizers, are all aligned to the standards. Hands-on opportunities for students and communities to learn how to become masters of sustainability is the primary objective for this project. Kahuku High and Intermediate is proud to be a partner in the Island Innovation Grant.

 

OUR SUSTAINABILITY EDUCATION INITIATIVES:

 

Our Kahuku Renewable Energy Innovation Center group has spent the last 2 years organizing our infrastructure, relationships, organization and project in preparation for these new initiatives with KEAC, teachers, students, STEM administration, mentors and leaders in the local renewable energy industry. Dr. Kendra Martin and Dr. Don Sand have been instrumental in moving our ideas forward.

 

Our group is assisting Kahuku High & Intermediate students build over 50 aquaponics systems made from used food-grade 55 gallon plastic drums (that normally end up in landfills).  We would also like to design Archimedes water pumps powered by wind turbines (by using old bicycle wheels outfitted with wind blades) for the aquaponic systems (to avoid using costly electric pumps). Our goal is the provide sustainable, healthy, inexpensive and organic food growing systems for Ko'olauloa families using 95% less water than growing plants in dirt (in their own backyards) We plan to build the aquaponics systems behind Z building, which is between the Kahuku High & Intermediate school and the Kahuku Elementary school.  BYU Hawaii has over 100 students in their sustainability club and their food services dept has been doing aquaponics and vermiculture for over 2 years.  We are now working with PCC to collect their food waste for a vermiculture project.

 

Current Projects

 
  • renewable energy education
  • aquaponics, vermiculture, composting, permaculture, 
  • healthy and organic food lifestyles (alternatives to unhealthy fast food, processed food)
  • promotion of creative thinking, positive values
 

Measurable Outcomes

 
  • Number of KHIS students taught
  • Number of aquaponic units built
  • Number of Ko'olauloa families served with aquaponic units
  • Number of renewable energy education videos/lessons produced
  • Number of scholarship/internships offered
  • Number of letters of recommendations written for student interns
  • Number of mentors worked with
  • Number of college applications filled out (work with career center)
  • Number of college scholarships won
  • Number of meaningful and high paying careers started
 

HAWAII INNOVATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS

 

ORGANIZATION

 

The Ko`olauloa Educational Alliance Corporation (keac.info) Keoki Wallace

 

KEAC is a proactive association of school, business, and community members dedicated to providing career pathway partnerships and support to the Kahuku Complex Schools.

 

KEAC has the distinction of being the first Hawaii federal School-to-Work program to become a non-profit (501 c3) corporation.

 

KEAC’s mission is to support and enhance college preparation and career opportunities for the young people who attend KHIS.

 

KEAC initiatives in the Kahuku complex are many; including kahuku.org (an online store), the launching of the first advanced web design computer class on the Kahuku campus, and providing afterschool programs such as a film-digital media program that provides early career training in the industry.

 

Innovative Education (innovativeducation.info) Dr. Don Sand

 

A new project of KEAC

 

Oversees all digital media and sustainability initiatives by Hawaii Digital Media and Hawaii Sustainability, Halau Haloa

 

Has potential to become a new Department of Education Science Learning Center for Sustainability/Aquaponics

 

Tie in with Kahuku High’s Personal Transition Plan (PTP)

 

Tie in with Kahuku High’s College and Career Center

 

Tie in with Hawaii Green Jobs Initiative (HawaiiGreenJobs.org)

 

Tie in with The Hawai‘i Build and Buy Green, Brownfields Redevelopment Conference & Expo and Hawai‘i Green Workforce Development annual conferences on Oahu, Hawaii

 

Hawaii Digital Media (hawaiidigitalmedia.com) Dr. Don Sand

 

Create success value and sustainability films for K-12 students

 

Provide advanced film and television training

 

Create master teachers video library

 

Create digital media internships

 

Offer graphics and animation training

 

Teach and provide digital marketing

 

Provide digital business training and life skills

 

Provide innovative learning using a broadcast quality video camera

 

Create virtual classroom and distance education

 

Provide OB development in digital media, film and television for those living in Ko’olauloa

 

Provide consulting services for innovative education

 

Provide training to existing schools (charter, public and private)

 

The KHIS Kahuku Film Club was featured in Hiki No - May 2011 (PBS television program)

 

They won 1st place in the ‘Olelo Youth Exchange video competition May 2011 - (out of 600 entries)

 

Hawaii Kids Media (hawaiikidsmedia.com) Dr. Don Sand

 

Hawaii students creating films with mentors, politicians, experts

 

Hawaii Sustainability (hawaiisustainability.com) Christian Wilson

 

Provide scholarships to Kahuku high school students in exchange for their work on sustainability projects (aquaponics, vermiculture, fly larvae entrapment)

 

Partner with BYUH Food Services Sustainability Project, BYUH Sustainability Club, Kahuku First WInd, Kokua Hawaii Foundation, Polynesian Cultural Center, Hawaii Reserves, Hawaii Department of Agriculture, Waimanalo Feed Supply, Friendly Aquaponics.

 

Agricultural and organic produce

 

Kahuku Renewable Energy:  Renewable Energy (including photovoltaic, hydroponics, wind farms, OTEC, Ocean Thermal Energy Conservation

 

Provide eco-tourism experiences for students, families, tourists

 

Healthy eating, nutrition and food preparation

 

Provide agriculture internships

 

Support local farmer’s markets

 

Produced business management internship

 

Scholarship sponsorship and mentoring for students

 

Provide aquaponics and square foot gardening video training

 

Create and sell educational sustainability DVD’s produced by students

 

Provide OB development in Sustainability in Ko’olauloa

 

Provide consulting services and brain trust of experts from developing models into new construction

 

Halau Haloa (Kahuku Sustainability Club) (halauhaloa.com) Julian Tyrone and David

 

Create organic farm, aquaponics, vermiculture, larvae entrapment projects

 

Provide Aquaponic systems for families of four. Collect unwanted 55 gallon drums and wooden pallets that would normally end up in landfills and have Kahuku High and Intermediate School students transform them into perpetual food source that will provide local families and communities with fresh, organic vegetables, fruit, herbs and fish in their own backyards powered by a small photovoltaic system.  Build vertical windmills made from 55 gallon drums to power aquaculture water pumps.

 

Provide scholarship money for students building the systems instead of paying an hourly wage (use student payment model used by Ma’o Organic Farms). Partner with experts on aquaponics, sustainability systems, recycling, etc and use them as mentors for students so they can enter college and obtain a meaningful career that will support and sustain themselves and their families here on the islands. If requested, provide aquaponic systems for church properties, social service providers (Salvation Army), schools, etc.

 

Kahuku Green Team (renewable-resource.com) Uila Vendiola

 

Provide Renewable Energy Education for students K-12

 

Provide tours of Kahuku First Wind to Hawaii K-12 schools (20 year partnership)

 

Administration of Innovative Education project department:

 

2 Project managers

 

Part time staff to full time staff reflected by budget

 

Partner with DOE teachers to overlap curriculum with Innovative Education projects with proposed Science Learning Center

 

Grants and scholarships for BYUH, HPU, and U of H

 

Volunteers and strategic partners (industry leaders, parents, political and community leaders)

 

Student staff with paid internships (in the form of scholarships)

 

Classes brought to all schools in Ko’olauloa, from preschool to colleges

 

Setup education vehicle that will provide:

 

A distance education website (has free courses and sells DVD’s)

 

Students in a Sustainability program, helping to shoot and edit video curriculum using Halau Haloa-Kahuku Sustainability Club

 

A couple of “Living School“ models such as Kahana Bay’s taro and fish ponds

 

A couple of sample curriculum programs finished as samples of participatory, hands-on, purpose and project learning

 

Incentive program: include certification levels, internship criteria

 

College teachers as well as cultural kupunas in Polynesian agriculture on the brain trust for program development and curriculum development

 

Create a DOE Learning Center for Aquaponics

 

SOME OF OUR RECENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN HAWAII

 

Two years ago, our organization formed a trust of mentors for a branch called the Kahuku Renewable Energy Innovation Center (KREIC).  The mission is to build and promote educational opportunities for KHIS students in sustainability and renewable energy technology fields.  This volunteer group is comprised of university professors, kupunas, community members, employees of Hawaii renewable energy companies, parents of students, KHIS science teachers and the KHIS principal, counselors and students.

 

Our latest initiative, Innovative Education, is comprised of filmmakers, scientists, Kupuna and agricultural teachers  (Dr. Don Sand, Dr. Clyde Tamaru, Dr. Kai Fox, Dr. Kendra Martin, Christian Wilson) is an additional branch of KEAC that is writing curriculum and  delivering educational programs that engage, inspire, create learning experiences using student relevant subjects such as digital media, current youth issues, sustainability, aquaponics, organic farming, participatory learning and life skills. The “Film Club” is our after school program that currently has 27 active members.  Our new Kahuku Sustainability Club named Halau Haloa currently has 20 members.

 

COMMUNITY NEEDS BEING ADDRESSED

 

The students living in the Ko’olauloa District (Ka’a’awa, Punalu’u, Hau’ula, Laie, Kahuku and Sunset Beach) have unmet needs for educational experiences that are relevant to several rapidly growing modern industries such as film, digital media and the sustainability industry.  These are fields that will provide jobs and advanced education for those students who are allowed to learn these skill sets early.  The traditional school system is slower in responding to these relevant programs that we are helping to bring now, today.

 

The Innovation Education branch is dedicated to helping students receive programs in these 21st century industries.  The programs are developed and delivered in creative, participatory methods that are based on living projects in self-directed ways. It is believed that the students not only learn advanced knowledge in these relevant industries but that they develop actual skills sets needed to become valued employees.

 

The students learn business world and college world “people skills”, project management skills, leadership, teamwork, time management and problem solving.  Each target student groups can be inspired accelerate their educational productivity.

 

The “at risk” students find that there are reasons for learning traditional subjects in school and the advanced students are allowed to enhance their gifts and dreams.

 

WHAT WE DO

 

Funds and support would help increase capacity of our after school programs including the Kahuku Sustainability and Film clubs and building living sustainability projects.  We will continue to develop new advance curriculum and film the student projects as a “students teaching students” educational video series   A portion of the funds would be used to hold contests around renewable energy issues that would inspire students to learn using a camera as a fun learning tool.

 

OUR INTENDED PARTICIPANTS

 

Our target group continues to be 2 very different youth groups, the “at risk” students and the “gifted students”.  The goal is to bring these educational experiences to at least 100 per year in the sustainability programs and 100 students  in the film-digital media programs.  The students will be selected from those attending KHIS, while 100 more students will be offered program experiences from Kahuku Elementary School.

 

OUTCOMES WE EXPECT

 

The outcomes would be measured in terms of the number of students in the programs, learning projects, and learning contests.  We will continue to build a platform in Kahuku that will become a major pipeline for innovative learning programs, mentors, internships, and courses in 21st Century careers skills and knowledge.  Benefits to students will include a decrease in drop out students, improvement of grades, and more gifted students entering the competitive smart technological fields that add to the quality of life in the islands.

 

HOW WE WILL MEASURE THE EXPECTED OUTCOMES

 

The success of our program can be measured by the number of students taking the sustainability and renewable energy classes and the digital media courses. We will also measure the number of students that have received certifications and have participated in our learning experience projects, contests, and field trips.  Motivation of the students in our programs can be measured by attendance, improvement in grades, and placement in colleges.  These accumulated certifications, interactions with mentors, new letters of recommendations, sustainability and digital media contests won will go far to improve the chances of students being accepted in colleges and receiving scholarships.

 

HOW FUNDS ARE SPENT

 

The aquaponic projects will require the purchase of all materials to build the working model including pumps, foundation, scaffolding, sun screens, tubs, soil, starter fish and plant seed.  A portion of the funds would be used to develop more curriculum in both digital media and agriculture.  Student incentives would include prizes for the contests and token fees for mini-internships.

 

RENEWABLE RESOURCES

 

Because of Hawaii’s ideal location and temperature, its residents can become masters of sustainability and stop being dependent on the grid by paying the most expensive electricity, gas and food in the nation.

 

LOCAL FOOD PRODUCTION

 

Use simplicity and affordability of aquaponics and vermiculture to encourage the growing organic food in backyards or apartment lanai’s of Hawaii residents.

 

SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION IN THE ABOVE AREAS

 
We need to reduce our dependency on fossil fuels by growing our own food where we live thus reducing the need to:
  • ship from the mainland and to stores from warehouses, and from warehouse to grocery stores,
  • drive to a grocery stores and gas stations
We need to grow our own produce so we can know:
  • the source of our food
  • we can be assured the food is not genetically modified contaminated with unsafe fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides (our food would be organically grown and harvested)
  • how we can be prepared for a disaster when gas, food and money is not available
  • how we need to be examples to our children and grandchildren that it is possible to live off the food we grow ourselves

 

ORGANIZATION

 

Demonstrate innovation and local leadership

 

Our organization will consist of a partnership of forward-thinking individuals who see the value of assisting the youth of our communities to take aquaponics and sustainability as a way of life.  They will also recognize the value of the educational process they will be engaged in along the way.

 

Have the potential for growth and success due to our involvement

 

It will be relatively easy to scale for growth since aquaponics uses very little space and few resources.  Every family in Hawaii should have access to inexpensive, fresh organic produce.  Every student in Hawaii deserves the chance to learn about aquaponics and fulfill the DOE rubrics at the same time.

 

COMMUNITIES

 

Stem from ideas and inspiration that are born in Hawai'i to meet the needs of Hawai'i

 

Ancient Hawaiians were masters of sustainability. We need to re-create how Hawaiians turned the most remote islands into sustaining over a million people without modern technology.

 

OUR PROJECTS

 

Employ scalable technologies and models that are applicable globally

 

Both Concepts and Proposals will be evaluated on four criteria. Criteria will share equal weight in making selections.

 

1. The proposed project is truly innovative. It breaks with conventional ideas or processes in its field. It goes beyond marginal improvement of methods that already exists.

 

2. The project is beyond merely the idea stage. There has been additional testing, demonstration or prototyping. The applicant has invested time, resources, and thought into assessing project viability.

 

3. The innovation has clear potential for impact beyond the applicant organization. If successful, the project could scale up to reach more people, other communities, or additional organizations. The applicant identifies a plan for doing this.

 

4. The innovation team has the experience, knowledge and skills to successfully implement the project. If partners are needed, they are identified and their contributions are clear.

 

Strategies Used:

 

We recognize there are many avenues of innovative change. The Island Innovation Fund is focused on three strategies that hold promise for broad impact in Hawai'i, and preference will be given for projects that:

 
  • Deploy human capital in unique and innovative ways
  • Implement new technologies that enable impact on a larger scale
  • Utilize networks of people and organizations to work toward a shared vision of social change
 

Questions:

 

What is aquaponics?

 

Why aquaponics?

 

What is the difference between organic and non-organic food?

 

Why should we be concerned with our food supply?

 

Why should we be concerned about the quality and availability of food?

 

How does the price of gas affect food prices?

 

Why use aquaponics for food storage?

 

Why use water catchment systems, vermiculture, vermicast and worm tea?

 

How can aquaponics help my family?

 

How much does one cost?

 

How do you build it?

 

Aquaponics is excellent means of demonstrating many principles of science, agriculture, math and business in all grade levels. Applications of these technologies are only limited by ones imagination. A unit in aquaponics enforces practical uses of chemistry, mathematics, physics, economics and engineering. The monitoring and care of an aquaponic system by students helps instill a sense of responsibility, inspires creativity and creates excitement in the learning environment. In addition to the plant sciences, aquaponics incorporates and demonstrates many of natures natural cycles, nitrification, biology, fish anatomy and nutrition and high-tech agriculture.

 

Aquaponics is excellent means of demonstrating many principles of science, agriculture, math and business in all grade levels. Applications of these technologies are only limited by ones imagination. A unit in aquaponics enforces practical uses of chemistry, mathematics, physics, economics and engineering. The monitoring and care of an aquaponic system by students helps instill a sense of responsibility, inspires creativity and creates excitement in the learning environment. In addition to the plant sciences, aquaponics incorporates and demonstrates many of natures natural cycles, nitrification, biology, fish anatomy and nutrition and high-tech agriculture.

 

 

Three Rules of Work: Out of clutter find simplicity; From discord find harmony; In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity.

 

- Albert Einstein


If you would like your school to visit our sustainability program, feel free to contact us by clicking here.
 
Our school hours are generally M-F from 8am to 3pm.
 
All campus visitors must report to the administration office and fill out a visitor form and wear a visitor badge.
 
Suggested places to visit that are nearby:
  • Kahuku Farms
  • Mohala Farms
  • Keana Farms Zip Line
  • Polynesian Cultural Center
  • Turtle Bay Resort
 
 
 
Definition of Environmental Sustainability:
 
 
Finding and Resolving the Root Causes of the Sustainability Problem:
 
 
Lexicon of Sustainability:
 
Kahuku Green Team Facebook Page: